ATMA
ABOUT ATMA
MANAGING COMMITTE
PAST PRESIDENT
MEMBERS
ROLES & ACTIVITIES
IMPORTANT EVENTS
TEXTILE INDUSTRY
PRESENT
PERSPECTIVE
VALUE CHAIN
GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
STRATEGIES
AHMEDABAD TEXTILE INDUSTRY
CHRONOLOGY
STATISTICS
BEYOND BUSINESS
CITIZENSHIP/ CIVIC
AFFAIRS
INSTITUTE BUILDING
SOCIAL CAUSES
BUILDING
ARCHITECTURAL LANDMARK
DRAWINGS
PICTURE GALLERY
VISITORS BOOK
ROLE AND ACTIVITIES



In its life-span of nearly 110 years, ATMA’s mission has been to promote the interests of the local n textile industry as well as trade. ATMA has been recognized by the Central and State Governments as the sole representative body for the textile mills in this centre. Representation has been granted to ATMA on a number of government and public bodies. Further, its opinions and recommendations have usually weighed with the government in framing their policies, particularly for the textile industry.

Centralised Services

During the Second World War, the local textile mills experienced hardship in procuring essential materials. ATMA took to procure and distribute controlled materials (eg. coal) that were in short supply, with the help of the government. Before the introduction of rationing, ATMA had made arrangements for sale of food grains and sugar to the general public at cost price and thereby endeavored to promote good relations between the industry, workers and the public. Over time, ATMA’s role has undergone change. Many of its direct services to the mills (eg procurement of materials) have shrunk or ceased altogether. At the same time, functions like centralised collection of octroi from the industry through ATMA, continue. The textile industry is still the largest payer of octroi in the city.

Influencing Government Policy


Very early on, the Association played a proactive role in influencing government policy. For example, in 1923, as representative of the Millowners’ Constituency in the Delhi Legislative Assembly, Kasturbhai Lalbhai took up the issue of the 3.5 percent countervailing excise duty on Indian textiles, which had been unjustly imposed to counterbalance the duty on the imports from Lancashire. The resolution was passed with a large majority and the Indian Government was compelled to scrap the measure that had plagued the Indian textile industry for nearly 30 years.

Today, ATMA’s most important function is to voice the concerns of the organised textile sector and act as a pressure group to influence government policy. ATMA makes representations before the concerned authorities, on behalf of its members, on various issues directly and indirectly affecting the industry. Every year, ATMA submits a pre-budget memorandum to the Governments of India and Gujarat. ATMA is a member of the advisory council of the Ahmedabad Electricity Company. ATMA is also a member of the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industries (FICCI), as well as the International Chamber of Commerce. These organisations act as lobbying bodies.

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